Wood Species

WOOD FLOORING SPECIES

Below you can see a picture and description of many types of hardwood floors. Please keep in mind that the pictures may not reflect exactly how your floor will look, as every wood has variance.

photo showing a swatch of red oak with and without a finish

RED OAK

Red oak has a light pinkish tan to a medium brown hue with a prominent grain pattern throughout. The prominent graining of oak allows the wood to hide daily wear and tear better than other woods.  Red oak also accepts stain more evenly than other woods.  It is fairly hard and stable wood but is used as the average and the benchmark from which to judge other woods.

photo showing a swatch of cherry with and without a finish

CHERRY

Cherry has a warm medium brownish orange brown hue with a moderate grain pattern throughout. The natural colour of cherry will darken with exposure to light, more noticeably than other woods. It is 26% softer than red oak and 33% more stable.

black walnut with and without a finish

WALNUT

Walnut has a dark rich brown hue with a noticeable light sapwood content unlike most woods.  Graining is minimal but it can differ from a straight grain to a curly grain throughout the floor.  Walnut is 22% softer than red oak and 26% more stable.

photo showing a swatch of ash with and without a finish

ASH

Ash has a natural light yellow hue with a distinctive grain pattern throughout.  The natural graining of ash is a creamy white hue, which makes daily wear and scratching less noticeable.  Ash is 2% harder than red oak and 26% more stable.

photo showing a swatch of Australian Cypress with and without a finish

CYPRESS

Cypress has a golden brown hue with darker brown knotholes throughout. With any grade of cypress, there is a high degree of colour variation throughout the wood.

photo showing a swatch of beech with and without a finish

BEECH

Beech has a very pale to reddish brown to hue with a moderate grain pattern throughout.  The grain is mostly closed and is straight, fine and uniform in appearance, making it more uniform throughout compared to other woods. Although beech is 1% harder than red oak it is 17% less stable as well.

photo showing a swatch of birch with and without a finish

BIRCH

Birch has a pale to light tan hue with a moderate grain pattern throughout. With birch’s light colour and closed grain pattern, this wood is most often confused with maple.  Birch is 2% softer than oak and is 8% less stable.

photo showing a swatch of Brazilian cherry with and without a finish

BRAZILIAN CHERRY

This wood has a light reddish orange hue when initially installed but darkens to a rich reddish orange hue over time.  It has a light grain pattern but a large range of colour, unlike most woods.  Brazillian cherry is 82% harder than red oak and 19% more stable.

photo showing a swatch of Brazilian walnut with and without a finish

BRAZILIAN WALNUT

Brazilian walnut has a light tan, medium brown and greenish hue when initially installed but over time will develop a medium to dark brown hue with a moderate grain pattern throughout.  This wood shows a large colour variation unlike most other woods and will darken with exposure to sunlight.  Brazillian walnut is 185% harder than red oak and 7% more stable.

photo showing a swatch of heart pine with and without a finish

PINE

Varying in color from yellow/orange to yellowish brown, pine will darken over time and become a richer shade.  The predominant grain pattern can range from clear to knotty. Pine is 5% softer than red oak and 29% more stable.

photo showing a swatch of hickory-pecan with and without a finish

HICKORY

Hickory has both a light cream to a medium brown hue with variations in colour throughout.  Hickory is 41% harder than red oak and 11% less stable.

photo showing a swatch of maple with and without a finish

MAPLE

Maple has a pale to light tan hue with minimal grain patterning throughout. Maple does not stain well and can look blotchy especially with a dark stain.  This wood occasionally exhibits a curly or “bird’s eye” figuring, and while this is occasionally found in regular material, it is more prominent in Bird’s Eye Maple. Maple is 12% harder than oak and 4% more stable.

photo showing a swatch of white oak with and without a finish

WHITE OAK

A less common choice than red oak, this wood displays a dull gray to a light brown hue with a moderate grain pattern throughout.   The variations in colour and graining are noticeable in this wood, but not as noticeable as in red oak.  It is 5% harder than red oak and 1% more stable.

photo showing a swatch of Santos mahogany with and without a finish

SANTOS MAHOGANY

This wood has a warm reddish brown hue with a moderate grain pattern throughout.  The natural colour of Santos Mahogany will darken more than other woods with exposure to sunlight.  It is 71% harder than red oak and 36% more stable.

photo showing a swatch ofsapele with and without a finish

SAPELE

This wood has a rich reddish brown hue and a moderate grain pattern throughout. Sapele’s unique ribbon grain is not similar to most woods. It is 16% harder and 14% more stable than red oak.

photo showing a swatch of spotted gum with and without a finish

SPOTTED GUM

This wood has a light tan to dark brown hue with a moderate grain pattern throughout.  Spotted Gum has a noticeable colour variation and diverse grain pattern that makes it different from other woods.  This wood is 92% harder than red oak.

photo showing a swatch of bamboo

BAMBOO

Bamboo is light in hue with a fine moderate grain throughout.  Knuckling and fine lines can be observed consistently throughout the wood.   A highly renewable species, bamboo has become popular as a statement among those interested in environmental conservation.  It is 25% harder than red oak and 27% more stable.

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Species & Grades

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Finishes

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